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Tag Archives: Java

Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day Three

Episode 73

Two weeks ago we have covered first day of Geecon 2017 Kraków conference, day two was week ago. Now it’s time to take a closer look at third and final day. I’ve managed to participate in five talks this time.

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Henning Schwentner: Value types – the next big Java Thing.

“Codes like a class, works like an int” is the idea behind project Valhala – value types, the next big thing planned for Java after lambdas and modules. Objects have variable state and reside on heap, while values are immutable and reside on stack. The main benefit is ability to create rich domain models while retaining the high performance of primitives. Value types definition will be Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 8, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day Two

Episode 72

Last week went through stuff from the first day of Geeon 2017 conference, which took place between 17th to 19th May in Kraków. Today we will continue and cover seven talks I’ve been to on day two. There will be a lot of reactiveness, events, architecture, APIs, security and some pretty low level topics.

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Jakub Pilimon: Event Sourcing

Command query responsibility segregation, event sourcing and event driven architectures are typical buzzwords on conferences nowadays. Jakub introduced the idea and confronted the approach with relaying on object-relational mapping to do the job. There was quite a lot of live code and Hibernate guts debugging. We heard stories on how Twitter almost collapsed in 2012 due to using the same models for writing and reading data and how to lose a girlfriend due to different projections of event log in the relationship. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day One

Episode 71

As I’ve mentioned in the previous episode, I was attending a conference. Geecon 2017 took place between 17th to 19th May in Kraków. There were four tracks without explicit categorization, roughly 80 talks and 1200 people. The focus was mostly on Java with a pinch of soft topics, agile and similar stuff. It was the ninth edition, which took place at cinema complex about 5 kilometers from the city center.

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I’m a car person. Apparently, I have a train curse. Whenever I take a train, it is either significantly delayed, or breaks down in the middle of nowhere (hi Pyrkon 2013…). I was a bit hesitant to test the curse, and it still works to full extent, but more on that later. Let’s get down to business and review what I was able to grab from the event.

Talks

On day one, I’ve attended seven and a quarter of talks. A quarter, because one was so weak, that I’ve left after 15 minutes and started to wander mindlessly in the sea of conference sponsors. Let’s skip that one and see what good was out there. This will be a content-dense ride.

David Moore: Wrestling the Monolith

“Software is not done until last user is dead” – was the takeaway I liked the most in the keynote from Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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From Java Source to Bare Metal, Part One: An Unexpected Request

Episode 49

Imagine you are developing a web application based on a typical modern technology stack. In essence, the goal is to create something that receives requests from the network, processes them, and responds to them with some kind of structured data. It can be a fancy HTML webpage to be displayed in client’s web browser or it can be a raw text object to be consumed by another application web API. Have you ever wondered what exactly is going on behind the scenes? What is happening between the moment when the code you wrote is executed and the moment when electrical impulses jumps the network cable sticking out of that metal box in the data center? Let me take you on the journey along numerous layers of abstraction in modern software stack that must be bypassed to make things happen.

There and Back Again: Abstractions

Programming is all about abstractions. We endlessly put one layer above the other in order to deal with tremendous complexity of software and hardware. Often, we ignore most of the layers to focus on solving the actual problem at hand. In principle, sending a JSON object over the network might seem like an easy task with modern tools and frameworks. You generate the project, tweak just a little bit here and there, write one method with few annotations and there you go, it works. But the engineering problem of making this possible in an easy, fast, secure, reliable, scalable and manageable way is gargantuan. Looking at the big picture, it’s probably an effort of hundreds of thousands of software developers, architects, electronic and electrical engineers, computer scientist and mathematicians, spanned over several decades of work. All that, to let you do the job in a single pomodoro.

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Of course, to develop decent software, you don’t necessary have to understand exactly how all this works, it’s probably not even possible for a single human being to grasp all that in every detail. I believe however Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 22, 2016 in Spring, Technology

 

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Devoxx Antwerp 2013 reminiscence

Episode 20

Let’s get back in time. Devoxx 2013 in Antwerp was actually my first big IT conference. Since there was no direct flights, I drove there with two friends a bit over 1k km, which wasn’t so bad considering it was mostly German Autobahn and we had a nice car which itself had only 1k km of mileage (mileage given in km, doesn’t it sound funny?) when we started. It was nice little adventure.

How is Devoxx different than Jax? Well, it’s muuuch bigger. There was like 7 to 10 times more people. The conference took place in a second largest cinema complex in Europe, meaning that talks were delivered on big screens with excellent audio. There were 10 halls, two with capacity over 800 people. Exhibiting companies were like: Google, Oracle, Red Hat, Microsoft and that kind of league. There were chief architects of stuff. They were gadgets like chess robots, machinery out of Lego Technics bricks and all the stuff geeks like.

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There was even a game where you could see entire audience on the big screen, and there were virtual fruits (seen on the screen superimposed over the camera image) thrown at them. If the fruit happens to hit your location, you had to slash it with arm movement to get points. People were divided in two teams, two halves of the audience, and more hits equalled winning entire game.

Jax had better food on the other hand ;)

Similarly to posts on Jax, I will quickly present talks I’ve watched. Main part of Devoxx was one day longer than Jax, and I since it was almost a year, I don’t remember everything exactly, so there will be a selection.

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Lambda: A peek Under the Hood by Brian Goetz.

I made a reference to this talk already in The Peak of the Mountain. Very technical details of JVM internals, not for everyone and perhaps not so useful in everyday development, but very interesting for me. And the speaker is the chief Java Language architect.

The Crazyflie Nano Quadcopter by Crazyflie team.

One of the cool ones. Story of developing tiny quadcopter both from hardware and software point of view with all the ups and downs.

The Modular Java Platform and Project Jigsaw by Mark Reinhold.

Java is big and tangled, but there are efforts to untangle the platform and make it more efficient especially on tiny devices with very limited resources . Nice to see a talk by Java platform chief architect regardless of the topic.

Shaping the future of web development by Lars Bak.

Keynote by Google and official release of Dart 1.0 with ambitious dream, “ultimately to replace JavaScript as the lingua franca of web development on the open web platform”. Thumbs up. Most important thing for me is static type system. Writing anything bigger than 500 Lines of code in JS was always pain in the ass. It’s been 19 wonderful years, thank you very much, time for something better.

Java 8 Language Capabilities – What’s in it for you? by Venkat Subramaniam.

At the time that was the first presentation about lambdas for me. Very dynamic yet easy to follow and technically very well done.

Introduction to Google Glass by Alain Regnier.

Well, what can you say besides that Google Glass is an awesome technology. Still in prototype phase, and with a lot of improvements along the way. Alain presents how to connect to the device from your PC, how to control it with voice or head motion and what you can do with it. Possibilities seem to be endless.

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Taming Drones: How Java Controls the Uprising Drone Force by Timon Veenstra and Eva Veenstra-Kazakov

Another cool talk about quadcopters. You can buy one for $300, attach Raspberry Pi for $30, some sensors, do some programming and voilà, you have an autonomous drone which can fly over the field, do some photos and recharge itself when needed. At the end, you can use data to tell the farmer where he should apply more irrigation to get the most out of his plants. Countless other things you can do for a few bucks.

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Besides I remember attending Cryptographic operations in the browser by Nick Van den Bleeken, EJB 3.2 and Beyond by David Blevins, Java EE 7: What’s new in the Java EE Platform by Daniel Delabassee, Spring Framework 4.0 – The Next Generation by Sam Branen, Batch Applications or the Java Platform (JSR 352) by Scott Kurz. And there were few others I can’t remember.

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Overall, in my opinion Devoxx is much better than Jax. Longer, much more speakers to choose from, much more “cool” stuff outside of Big Data, Enterprise and Java for a very similar ticket price.

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And somehow I prefer both Belgian beer and weather over English ;) See you next time.

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Posted by on October 26, 2014 in News, Technology

 

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