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Amazon Messaging Services

Episode 79

As promised in the last episode, today we are going to look into the messaging category of AWS services group. Messaging is sometimes considered a part of application services group, however in the console they make up separate list, so let’s treat them the same here. Since the last article about security was quite long, this one will be shorter (also, it’s summer, the birds are shining, the sun is chirping, the water is wet, so…).

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AWS messaging currently consist of Simple Queue Service, Simple Notification Service and Simple Email Service. Everything looks simple, so let’s dive in.

Simple Queue Service

AWS SQS was the first web service ever introduced by Amazon. The year was 2004 and cloud computing was no quite yet there. SQS is a Message Queuing Service which is a Message Oriented Middleware (MOM), but in the cloud, instead of on premises. SQS allows to decouple system actors working in Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 20, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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Amazon Security Services, Part Two

Episode 78

Last week we started with AWS security by introducing Identity and Access Management in details. Today we will look at what’s else in the security services group and talk about how not to get hacked in the cloud in general.

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Remaining named services we are interested in are Inspector, Certificate Manager, Directory Service, Web Application Firewall, Shield, Key Management Service, CloudHSM and Organizations. We will also look at Shared Responsibility Model.

Inspector

AWS Inspector is an automated auditing service. It uses a low-level agent deployed on EC2 instances to monitor system state, processes, network communication, installed software and other parameters in order to benchmark, spot security vulnerabilities and deviations from best practices. First we need to define an assessment template, which governs what targets should be tested, as well as subset of rules. There is plenty of Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 13, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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Amazon Security Services, Part One: IAM

Episode 77

As promised in the last episode, we will start with Amazon Web Services security today. As this is large topic, I’ve decided to split it into two articles in a similar way I did with AWS networking. In the first part, we will cover the fundamental service from the security group: Identity and Access Management and all concepts related to it. In the second part, we will look into other security services and AWS security in general.

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Identity and Access Management is a service that let us control how people and machines access and operate on AWS resources. It’s used to facilitate authentication and authorization of different types of principals, organize them in groups and assign polices that allow flexible and fine grained regulation over who can do what and when. Not surprisingly, IAM can be controlled via AWS console, CLI or SDK.

Principals

First important concept in IAM is the Principal. It’s an entity that is allowed to interact with AWS resources, that may be permanent or temporary and it might be human being or an application. Principal related concepts include: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on July 6, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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Amazon Networking Services, Part Two

Episode 76

In the previous episode, we started dive into Amazon networking services group with VPC. I’ve mentioned networking services in the AWS introduction episode, as one of three most basic, along with storage and compute.

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Aside from VPC, networking category consists of three more services: Route 53, a DNS provider named after port number not the American Highway. CloudFront, for throwing pictures of cats at our users even faster. Finally, Direct Connect, to upload those pictures to the cloud while offline (and of course: faster).

Route 53

Route 53 is a Domain Name System (DNS), a naming service used since the beginning of the Internet. It facilitates translation of human-friendly names into IP addresses understood by routers, computers and other connected devices that supports TCP/IP stack. When we type an address in the browser, it’s checked whether it’s stored locally and if not, if it’s available in DNS cache. If it’s not, there is a query to Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 29, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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Amazon Networking Services, Part One: VPC

Episode 75

We had a four-week break from AWS to talk extensively about GeeCON, as well as our guest author article about scaling Scrum. Let’s get back to the cloud again as we have another important group of services to tackle. I’ve mentioned networking services in the AWS introduction episode, as one of three most basic, along with storage and compute. This was supposed to be third article about group of services, but somehow it comes fourth, after an article on databases. Also, it will have two parts. Let’s start with VPC service.

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Virtual Private Cloud is used to divide our cloud into logically separate sections and conquer various network elements, including: subnets, route tables, DHCP, access control lists, security groups, internet gateways, elastic IPs, elastic network interfaces, endpoints, NAT gateways and instances, peering connections and VPN configurations. Lots of stuff to play with indeed.

Basics

VPC is a networking layer for EC2 instances. It was launched three years later than EC2 and, because of that, there are actually two networking platforms in AWS. The older one is called EC2-classic, but Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 23, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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Nexus Overview

Episode 74

First guest author has arrived! Today’s episode is written by Kate Terlecka and will be an introduction to The Nexus Framework, a tool for Scrum scaling. Have fun!

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What’s the most fashionable word in current agile world?

Scaling!

Yep. If you don’t scale you’re a lame 1999 oldtimer, not worthy of attention. Only Scrum? But you’re supposed to have BIG Scrum!

There is a reason why creators of two largest Scrum scaling frameworks refused to describe and name them for years. Only when SAFe started being marketed aggressively, they’ve had a change of heart. Bas Vodde and Craig Larman decided to name what they have been teaching for years LeSS (Large Scale Scrum) and Ken Schwaber decided to finally formalize and name Nexus. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 15, 2017 in Agile

 

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Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day Three

Episode 73

Two weeks ago we have covered first day of Geecon 2017 Kraków conference, day two was week ago. Now it’s time to take a closer look at third and final day. I’ve managed to participate in five talks this time.

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Henning Schwentner: Value types – the next big Java Thing.

“Codes like a class, works like an int” is the idea behind project Valhala – value types, the next big thing planned for Java after lambdas and modules. Objects have variable state and reside on heap, while values are immutable and reside on stack. The main benefit is ability to create rich domain models while retaining the high performance of primitives. Value types definition will be Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 8, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day Two

Episode 72

Last week went through stuff from the first day of Geeon 2017 conference, which took place between 17th to 19th May in Kraków. Today we will continue and cover seven talks I’ve been to on day two. There will be a lot of reactiveness, events, architecture, APIs, security and some pretty low level topics.

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Jakub Pilimon: Event Sourcing

Command query responsibility segregation, event sourcing and event driven architectures are typical buzzwords on conferences nowadays. Jakub introduced the idea and confronted the approach with relaying on object-relational mapping to do the job. There was quite a lot of live code and Hibernate guts debugging. We heard stories on how Twitter almost collapsed in 2012 due to using the same models for writing and reading data and how to lose a girlfriend due to different projections of event log in the relationship. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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Geecon 2017 Kraków: Day One

Episode 71

As I’ve mentioned in the previous episode, I was attending a conference. Geecon 2017 took place between 17th to 19th May in Kraków. There were four tracks without explicit categorization, roughly 80 talks and 1200 people. The focus was mostly on Java with a pinch of soft topics, agile and similar stuff. It was the ninth edition, which took place at cinema complex about 5 kilometers from the city center.

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I’m a car person. Apparently, I have a train curse. Whenever I take a train, it is either significantly delayed, or breaks down in the middle of nowhere (hi Pyrkon 2013…). I was a bit hesitant to test the curse, and it still works to full extent, but more on that later. Let’s get down to business and review what I was able to grab from the event.

Talks

On day one, I’ve attended seven and a quarter of talks. A quarter, because one was so weak, that I’ve left after 15 minutes and started to wander mindlessly in the sea of conference sponsors. Let’s skip that one and see what good was out there. This will be a content-dense ride.

David Moore: Wrestling the Monolith

“Software is not done until last user is dead” – was the takeaway I liked the most in the keynote from Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2017 in Misc, News, Technology

 

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Amazon Database Services

Episode 70

Today we will continue with AWS stuff after a short break. You might remember a brief introduction to the database category in Episode 65: The Amazon Web Services Jungle. It’s time to expand upon that a bit as we did with compute and storage categories before.

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We will dive a bit deeper into four services, which somehow represents different approaches to organized data storage: Relational Database Service, DynamoDB – a NoSQL database, ElastiCache – an in-memory data grid and Redshift – data warehouse.

RDS – Long time ago…

Amazon RDS, released in 2009, is a service for managing “classic” relational databases, stuff that usually first comes to mind when we think of “database”.  RDS offers several engines: PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle database, MS SQL Server and Amazon’s own AuroraDB. The service simplifies setting up a database – we don’t have to prepare a machine, install the database server on it, care about updates, licensing, HDD size, CPU, RAM, scaling, backups, replication, stand-by and Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2017 in AWS, Cloud, Technology

 

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