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Tag Archives: Docker

Virtualization and Containers Intro

Episode 56

Container revolution is one of the hottest topics nowadays in software development industry. The little blue whale, the Docker logo, can be seen on most programming conferences as well as numerous Twitter feeds of, so called, IT influencers.

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Today, along with containers, we will talk about their older and fatter siblings: virtual machines. It’s good to understand similarities and differences between those two and how to take advantage of that. We will talk about what containers are and what they are not. Contrary to what might have seem, containers did not render virtual machines entirely obsolete and there are reasons to use both.

Virtual Machines

Virtual machines are emulations of computer architectures and provide functionality of a physical machine using appropriate combination of software and hardware. It’s not a new concept, as first implementation dates back to systems developed in the sixties like IBM CP-40. They are commonly used to Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2017 in Cloud, Technology

 

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From Java Source to Bare Metal, Part Two: The Desolation of Bytecode

Episode 50

In the previous episode, we started a journey through layers of abstraction of modern back-end web application. As a response to unexpected request, a Hobbit object is going to an adventure, and must travel safely across the technology stack. We seek an answer to the question what happens between Java code and the physical machine. Perhaps, even further.

Our Hobbit leaves the, yet familiar, plain of web framework and goes deep down under the Misty Server Mountains.

Riddles in the Dark: The Server

The code sits atop of web framework, and web framework sits atop of web server. That was mostly true until recently. Now, with Spring Boot, it is common that instead of deploying packed application to the server, there is a fat jar that contains embedded server inside an application. No configuration, no deployment, just running a single jar. Simple solution for simple problems, but of course it’s no silver bullet and might not fit everywhere. How does the server and the application fit together?

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There are different tiers of servers, as I wrote some time ago. The largest that we care about are application servers, like Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 29, 2016 in Technology

 

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Building Microservices

Episode 40

I haven’t written anything in Books category this year, so it’s time to fix this. I have found Building Microservices by Sam Newman when browsing shelf of mini library next to the kitchen in our office, while waiting for my coffee. What caught my attention was a new and shiny book among bunch of uhm… mature ones. Besides, amongst all that noise regarding microservices in the industry, I thought it’s good to read some damn book instead of watching random talks from people shouting, “hey we did microservices in our company too, we are so cool and trendy!”. I like books, I’m old school.

Premise

lrgQuoting the book cover itself:

“Distributed systems have become more fine-grained in the past 10 years, shifting from code-heavy monolithic applications to smaller, self-contained microservices. But developing these systems brings its own set of headaches. With lots of examples and practical advice, this book takes a holistic view of the topics that system architects and administrators must consider when building, managing, and evolving microservice architectures”

Yes, we can hear that everywhere now. You might have an idea that everyone has migrated to microservices or is in the process of it, but it’s bullshit. Most systems I’ve seen recently are nowhere near that, and it doesn’t seem to change anytime soon.  So perhaps it’s good to rant about this on and on, but also investigate the topic a bit further that “hey we have to do this, everyone is doing it, let’s do this!”. There are pros, there are cons and there are Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 20, 2016 in Books, Technology

 

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